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So far John Montgomery has created 237 blog entries.

El Casco Art Hotel

El Casco Art Hotel is located on the southern shore of Lake Nahuel Huapi in Bariloche, Argentina.

Each of the 33 guestrooms showcases up to a dozen original artworks by one of Argentina’s most influential artists; in fact, the collection of paintings and sculptures has more than 500 pieces.

Accommodations 

As the hotel is oriented along the lake edge, most rooms have views of the lake. Each guest room at El Casco Art Hotel is furnished with television, security box, hair dryer, slippers, bathrobes, minibar, and Wi-Fi. Twice daily housekeeping is provided.

El Casco Art Hotel has five room categories:


Studio Bustillo 

Measuring 322 square feet, the Studio Bustillo rooms are furnished with a queen bed. Each Studio Bustillo features original artwork. Maximum occupancy is 2 guests.


Studio Nahuel  

Measuring 484 square feet, the Studio Nahuel rooms are furnished with a queen bed or two twin beds. Each room features original artwork. These rooms are large enough to accommodate a roll-away bed (subject to availability). Maximum occupancy is 3 guests.


Nahuel Corner

Measuring 559 square feet, the Nahuel Corner rooms are furnished with a queen bed. Each Nahuel Corner room features original artwork. These rooms are large enough to accommodate a roll-away bed (subject to availability). Maximum occupancy is 3 guests.


Master Suite

Measuring 990 square feet, the Master Suite is furnished with a king bed. The Master Suite features original artwork. The room is are large enough to accommodate a roll-away bed (subject to availability). Maximum occupancy is 3 guests.


Studio Nahuel Balcony

Measuring 602 square feet, the Studio Nahuel Balcony rooms are furnished with a queen bed. Each room features a balcony with lake views, and original artwork. These rooms are large enough to accommodate a roll-away bed (subject to availability). Maximum occupancy is 3 guests.

Amenities

Among the amenities at El Casco Art Hotel are concierge service, a sculpture garden, restaurant, wine cellar, fitness center, heated swimming pool, sauna, and jetted tub.

Activities

El Casco Art Hotel is located 30 minutes by road from San Carlos de Bariloche, situated in the foothills of the Argentine Andes on Lake Nahuel Huapi. Bariloche began as an outpost for early German settlers. The town later attracted Swiss, Austrian, Italian, and Chilean immigrants.

Summer high season runs from November to March, with highs near 70° and lows around 40°.

Guests typically stay three or four nights. Since 2006, LANDED has arranged experiences such as these for our guests in Bariloche:

  • Privately guided canoe or lake kayak trips
  • Navigations on Lake Nahuel Huapi (private or group options) with privately guided hiking and lake shore picnics
  • Privately guided rafting trips
  • Day trips to a private estancia for hiking, canoeing, and horseback riding
  • Chocolate making classes and chocolate tastings
  • Condor viewing excursions with an expert ornithologist
  • Privately guided fly-fishing outings
  • Privately guided mountain biking and hiking in the Andes
  • Multi-sport adventures combining mountaineering, kayaking, and hiking
  • Helicopter overflights of glaciers and lakes
  • Privately guided scenic driving tours
  • Wine tastings
  • Cooking classes and chef’s table dining
  • Photo workshops with master photographers (November to March)
  • Private lakeside dinners
  • Privately guided backcountry skiing, snowboarding, and snowshoeing days (June to August)

ARE YOU CONSIDERING A STAY AT EL CASCO ART HOTEL? LANDED PROVIDES PERSONALIZED, CUSTOM TRAVEL WITHIN CENTRAL AMERICA, SOUTH AMERICA, AND THE ANTARCTIC. WE’LL CREATE A UNIQUE ITINERARY PLAN TAILORED TO YOUR INTERESTS AND DREAMS. EXPERIENCE THE TRIP OF A LIFETIME. SPEAK WITH ONE OF OUR EXPERT TRAVEL PLANNERS TODAY AT 801.582.2100.

Private Villa in Patagonia: Paguimalal

PRIVATE VILLA IN PATAGONIA

Looking for a private retreat in Patagonia for your family or small group? Pucon is the outdoor adventure capital of northern Patagonia. Located in the Chilean Lake District, the city rests on the eastern shore of Villarrica Lake, roughly 10 miles north of the snow-capped Villarrica Volcano.

Overlooking the lake and its forested peninsula, Paguimalal is a private, family-owned estate. The name is a play on the names of the owners’ three children (Paloma, Guillermo, and Matilde) and the Mapuche word for “place”. This is an ideal location for families or groups–up to 14 guests–to gather and enjoy this wild region.

Private

The 7,750-square-foot home rests on 44 acres of green fields, wildlife-friendly flowers, and native forest. A stream feeds the swimming pool and wood-fired hot tub.

The homeowners–Marina and Guillermo–spent their childhood family vacations in Pucon, and first met on one of the lake’s beaches. Pucon is part of their family history: Marina’s family was among the first settlers, and her grandfather opened Pucon’s first hotel.

As they raised their children together, the homeowners dreamt of a vacation home in this area. Over the years, they looked at several pieces of land, but none felt right. Then, miraculously, they were given the chance to acquire the estate of their dreams–a privileged location overlooking the lake and peninsula. Even the volcano summit is visible on a clear day.

The home is accessed by a private road and gate, approximately 10 minutes by car from downtown Pucon. The property is large enough to support two helicopters simultaneously.

Charming

Although the home is spacious, guests are charmed by its coziness. The wood-lined interior, multiple fireplaces, and a library of regional photo books draw guests together. Picture windows bathe the rooms in soft light. Gathering spaces are oriented to take advantage of the lake views.

You’ll spend your evenings enjoying prismatic sunsets, relaxing in the garden hot tub, and dining on showcase regional meals. Each dinner is included in your stay, and prepared to your tastes by top local chefs who cook for Paguimalal guests out of deep affection for the homeowners. Beer, soft drinks, house wine, and bottled water are also included.

An experienced kitchen staff prepares daily lunches and breakfasts, included in your stay. An English-speaking concierge is on call to arrange touring and restaurant reservations. Daily housekeeping, with turndown service, is included. Anything you need–from gear rental to on-request laundry service–is tended to expertly.

House Amenities

  • Panoramic lake and peninsula views
  • Living / dining room with large fireplace
  • Professional display kitchen and back-of-house kitchen
  • Second living room with games, 40-inch television, and fireplace
  • Two furnished terraces
  • Organic garden and hen house (fresh daily eggs)
  • Walking trail
  • 30-meter swimming pool (chemical free; cleaned naturally by aquatic plants)
  • Wood-fired hot tub tucked into the trees
  • Sun deck with lounge chairs, sun umbrellas, and bean bag seating
  • Roofed barbecue patio with fireplace / charcoal grill and long-table seating for 18 guests
  • Private access (security gate controlled)

Lodging is also available for support staff.

BEDROOMS & BATHROOMS

1 Master Bedroom — Ground floor, super king-size bed (2×2 meters), fireplace, heated floors, walk-in closet, en suite with room with two shower heads and freestanding bathtub. Lake views and private terrace.

3 Guest Bedrooms (three bedrooms of this type) — Ground floor, two full-size beds (1.35×2 meters) combinable to queen bed, ensuite bathroom with shower, closet, lake views. Upper floor mezzanine loft with closet, forest view, and two single beds (0.9×2 meters) combinable to a queen bed.

1 Exterior Suite — Second floor, queen bed, woodturning stove, en suite bathroom. This room is accessed from the exterior of the home.

Exciting

Pucon is sometimes called the Jackson Hole of South America–a place with natural beauty, a vibrant town center, and dozens of outdoor activity options.

Guests at Paguimalal enjoy privately-guided experiences, tailor-made to their interests, skills, and desired level of activity. Each guide is hand-selected by the homeowners, and most of the excursions are included in your stay*.  Some activities are scheduled in advance, while others can be timed with same-day flexibly.

* Some activities (e.g. fly fishing, helicopter flights, and jet boat use carry an additional surcharge).

A tree in the edge of a picture of the Pucon Volcano, photographed while hiking the lake distric in Chile

Summer

During the shoulder and summer months of October to April, guests at Paguimalal can enjoy:

  • Hiking
  • Biking
  • Trekking in the ancient forest, to waterfalls, and on the volcano
  • Via ferrata canyon ascents
  • Waterfall rappelling (canyoning)
  • Zip-line canopy touring
  • Horseback riding (in forests, mountains, or at a Spanish riding school)
  • Rafting and river floats
  • Sailing and sailing lessons
  • Kayaking and canoeing
  • Hydrospeed (river boarding)
  • Power boating (26-foot Cobalt with seating for 14 guests; water skiing, wake boarding, wake surfing)
  • Day trips to the lake’s volcanic sand beaches
  • Jet boating *
  • Off-road motor biking (for experienced riders)
  • Visit to the volcano’s lava tubes
  • Visits to native Mapuche communities (cultural exchange, weaving, music, and traditional food)
  • Patagonian forest foraging and cooking classes
  • Birding
  • Yoga and meditation classes
  • Visits to the Cassis chocolate factory, local pubs, or the town’s galleries and boutiques
  • Picnics and s’mores parties
  • Traditional Patagonian barbecues at the home
  • Fly fishing (for trout and salmon) *
  • Helicopter tours of the volcanos *
  • Heli-treking, held-biking, and heli-fishing *
  • Golf
  • Tennis
  • Visits to the hot springs

Winter

In the winter season (May to September) guest options include:

  • Skiing and snowboarding (usually June to September)
  • Dog sledding
  • Snowmobiling
  • Heli-skiing *
  • Helicopter tours of the volcanos *
  • Randonee / backcountry skiing on the Villarrica Volcano
  • Hiking
  • Visit to the volcano’s lava tubes
  • Visits to the hot springs
  • Yoga and meditation classes
  • Visits to the Cassis chocolate factory, local pubs, or the town’s galleries and boutiques
  • Picnics and s’mores parties
  • Cooking classes and foraging in the Patagonian forest
  • Visits to native Mapuche communities (cultural exchange, weaving, music, and traditional food)

* Some winter activities (e.g. helicopter flights carry an additional surcharge).

How to Reserve Paguimalal

Dreaming of Patagonia for your next family vacation? Want to experience the best of Chile’s amplified landscapes and warm welcomes?

Reach out to one of our expert travel planners today. We’re at your service.

Looking for the perfect vacation in Patagonia? LANDED provides personalized, custom travel within Central America, South America, and the Antarctic. We’ll create a unique itinerary plan tailored to your interests and dreams. Experience the trip of a lifetime. Speak with one of our expert travel planners today at 801.582.2100.

When to Visit Antarctica

What is the Best Time to Visit Antarctica?

When should you visit the Antarctic Peninsula and Sub-Antarctic Islands?  Antarctic wildlife is most active during the Austral summer (November to February). Wildlife are also active in the islands near Antarctica (the Sub-Antarctic Islands) during October and March. These months—October to March—are the ideal time to visit the Antarctic region.  Most cruises operate in Antarctica only during these months.

A small expedition group in a zodiac exploring a glacial arch during a trip to Antarctica

October

Early Austral Spring

  • In the Falkland Islands and South Georgia, summer arrives earlier than in the South Shetlands or the Antarctic Peninsula.
  • Seabirds and marine mammals begin mating rituals and breeding on these islands in October.
  • As this is “shoulder season” for Antarctic visitation, landing site cancelations due to sea ice and high winds are more likely.
Two off-white crab eater seals resting on an ice shelf overlooking the arctic ocean, spotted during a wildlife expedition in Antarctica

November & December

(Austral Spring to Early Summer)

  • Landing sites are at their most pristine; snow is still fresh, with little evidence of human visitation.
  • In the Sub-Antarctic islands and on the Antarctic Peninsula, penguins begin mating rituals, nest building, and stone stealing.
  • Penguin, cormorant, and petrel eggs are laid.
  • By the end of December, penguin chicks hatch in the South Shetland Islands.
  • The golden hours of dawn and dusk extend, allowing for spectacular landscape and sea-scape photos long into the night.
  • Some research stations open to visiting guests
  • Crabeater seal pups arrive from September to November. Elephant seals guard their beach territories and harems until December.
  • Weaners (elephant seal pups no longer being fed milk) may approach visitors at landing sites.
  • Large migratory whales (humpbacks, minke, and southern right whales) arrive during these months.
  • The winter sea-ice breaks up, allowing navigation between ice floes.
  • During November, landing site cancelations due to sea ice and high winds are more likely.
Group of Antarctic Birds and Penguins on a cluster of rocks by the Antarctic Ocean

January & February

Austral Summer

  • Penguin rookeries are full of life: chicks are hatching and parents are feeding them.
  • Fur seal and leopard seal pups have arrived.
  • Whales are at their most numerous.
  • Receding ice allows for exploration farther south along the Antarctic Peninsula.
Small tan seal with cute face on rocky bank in Antarctica

March

Austral Autumn 

  • Adult penguins molt and curious young penguins take to the seas.
  • Whale watching is still excellent! The migrating whales have mostly arrived, and the ocean is rich with food.
  • Receding ice allows for exploration to the deepest points south along the Antarctic Peninsula.
  • Green and pink algae blooms become visible on snowy slopes and ice cliffs.
  • Spectacular sunrises and sunsets.
  • This is also the season when most Antarctic Circle cruises are scheduled.
Whale tail just over the surface of the Antarctic, photographed on an wildlife watching excursion focusing on the Animals of Antarctica

Dreaming of Antarctica? LANDED provides personalized, custom travel within Central America, South America, and the Antarctic. We’ll create a unique itinerary plan tailored to your interests and dreams. Experience the trip of a lifetime. Speak with one of our expert travel designers today at 801.582.2100.

Argentina & Chile: Awasi Lodges

Matias de Cristobal is the Director General of Awasi.  He’s also a member of the Executive Committee and Board of Directors of Relais & Chateaux, and a Board Member of the W Hotel in Santiago, Chile.

In a relatively short time, Awasi has developed a reputation for operating some of the finest lodges in South America.

  • Awasi Atacama — a boutique hotel in the heart of San Pedro de Atacama. Private vehicles and one guide per guest room. Canyons, volcanoes, salt flats, lagoons, hot springs, and pre-Columbian sites. This is one of our favorite destinations for multi-generational families.
  • Awasi Patagonia — set on a private reserve looking out on the Torres del Paine. After a full-day of privately guided hiking, riding, biking, or puma tracking, it’s hard to beat a soak in your private wood-fired hot tub overlooking the Paine Massif.
  • Awasi Iguazu — located on the Argentine side of the falls, this lodge has changed the way visitors experience Iguazu. It’s no longer just a day trip or an overnight stay; now guests have a rationale for 3 and 4-night stays, visiting private reserves, hidden waterfalls, and Guarani villages.

Much of  Awasi’s success—the brand’s vision, personality, and strategy—can be credited to Matias. He’s a keen student of design, customer service, and philosophy.

He’s helped broaden the vision of what travel can mean—how the people we encounter, and the experiences we share, can shape our lives.

In this episode we discuss:

  • How he developed his outlook on meaningful life experiences;
  • His definition of what a true luxury is; and
  • Define what he calls “the Awasi spirit”.

Matias is a true friend, a mentor, and an innovator. Most of our conversations take place in noisy restaurants in Buenos Aires, so we recorded this interview by Skype.  One day soon I hope we’ll be recording a follow up from the Grand Canyon.

Show Notes

Matias is a logophile, and in well read on philosophy, history, business strategy, and religion. He’s always ready to recommend a book.  One of the classics he’s recommended to me is The Power of Myth by Joseph Campbell. One I’ve shared with him is The Power of Moments by Chip and Dan Heath.

When to Visit the Galapagos

Galapagos Weather

“Considering that these islands are placed directly under the equator, the climate is far from being excessively hot; this seems chiefly cause by the singularly low temperature of the surrounding water, brought here by the great southern Polar current. Except during one short season, very little rain falls, and even then it is irregular; but the clouds generally hang low.” — Charles Darwin

Climate

The Galapagos are equatorial. You might expect a tropical climate, but most areas of the islands are arid and dry. Year round, you can expect highs from the upper 70s to upper 80s, with lows between 75F and 65F.

During the cool season (roughly June to November) you may encounter mist, but virtually no rain. The mist is welcome; these islands receive direct overhead sun, and have very little shade. Expect highs in the upper 70s, and water temperatures near 72F.

The nutrient-rich Humboldt Current prevails, and water temperatures approach 72F.

Counterintuitively, the rainiest months are also the sunniest; air temperatures are finally high enough to condense the mist to rain.

But even the rainiest month, March, has only about two inches of precipitation for the entire month. High temperatures reach the upper 80s, with lows near 72F. The Panama Current prevails, with water temperatures near 75F.

Seasons in the Galapagos

Wet, or Warm Season(December to May) temperatures hover in the mid 80’s and even the 90’s. Rainfall is uncommon but strong, and water temperatures near the surface can average 75°. The island’s lack of shade and the equatorial sun combine to take a toll on visitors. Reflective sand and lava can magnify the effect. Winds and seas are generally calmer.

Garua, Dry, or Cool Season(June to November) brings merciful fog, drizzle, and cool winds. Overnight air temperatures drop into the high 60’s, with similar water temperatures near the surface. These months are the height of the breeding season for many of the island’s avian species. Winds and seas are less calm.

Best & Worst Months in Galapagos

May is often cited as the ideal month in terms of weather, water temperature, and wildlife. Guides will tell you their favorite months are April / May or December / January.

September is traditionally the least visited month; many cruise and land operators shut down in September for annual dry dock or repairs. Still, some visitors prefer to be in Galapagos at times when fewer people are in the islands.

Busiest Months in Galapagos

The busiest months mid-June to September and mid-December to mid-January. June to September is a season with families from North America, South America, and Europe on school vacation. December to January is festive season—also a busy time for families*. The most sought-after festive season space often sells out 18 months in advance.

*Most cruises have a minimum age (often eight to twelve years) while land-based programs do not usually have a minimum age.

Galapagos Weather Summary

Bottom line, this is a year-round, equatorial destination with very little seasonal or temperature change. Species migration is rarer than elsewhere; most birds are in residence continually. Rainfall is low and welcome. Seas are generally calm. There is no “bad” or “wrong” time to visit.

January in Galapagos

Climate

  • Average high: 86F
  • Average water temperature: 76F
  • Ocean current: Panama (warm) current
  • Precipitation: light
  • Sun intensity: high

Wildlife

  • Nesting: Giant tortoises, green sea turtles, red-footed and masked boobies, flamingos, magnificent frigates, great frigates, Galapagos penguins, finches, flightless cormorants
  • Mating: Land iguanas, marine iguanas, red-footed and masked boobies, flamingos, Galapagos penguins, finches, flightless cormorants
  • Absent: Waved albatrosses

Other

  • Excellent underwater visibility

February in Galapagos

Climate

  • Average high: 86F
  • Average water temperature: 77F (annual high)
  • Ocean current: Panama (warm) current
  • Precipitation: light
  • Sun intensity: high

Wildlife

  • Nesting: Giant tortoises, green sea turtles, red-footed and masked boobies, flamingos, magnificent frigates, great frigates, Galapagos penguins, finches, flightless cormorants, land iguanas, marine iguanas
  • Mating: Red-footed and masked boobies, flamingos, Galapagos penguins, finches, flightless cormorants
  • Absent: Waved albatrosses

Other

  • Excellent underwater visibility

March in Galapagos

Climate

  • Average high: 86F
  • Average water temperature: 77F
  • Ocean current: Panama (warm) current
  • Precipitation: highest this month, but still only two inches on average
  • Sun intensity: high

Wildlife

  • Nesting: Giant tortoises, green sea turtles, red-footed and masked boobies, flamingos, magnificent frigates, great frigates, Galapagos penguins, finches, flightless cormorants, land iguanas, marine iguanas
  • Mating: Red-footed and masked boobies, flamingos, Galapagos penguins, finches, flightless cormorants

Other

  • Excellent underwater visibility
  • Galapagos tortoise eggs are hatching
  • Waved albatrosses begin to arrive on Espanola Island

April in Galapagos

Climate

  • Average high: 88F
  • Average water temperature: 77F
  • Ocean current: Panama (warm) current
  • Precipitation: second highest this month, but still under two inches on average
  • Sun intensity: high

Wildlife

  • Nesting: Giant tortoises, green sea turtles, red-footed and masked boobies, flamingos, magnificent frigates, great frigates, Galapagos penguins, finches, flightless cormorants, land iguanas, marine iguanas, waved albatrosses
  • Mating: Red-footed and masked boobies, flamingos, Galapagos penguins, finches, flightless cormorants, waved albatrosses

Other

  • Galapagos tortoise hatching season concludes
  • Green sea turtle eggs begin hatching

May in Galapagos

Climate

  • Average high: 82F
  • Average water temperature: 76F
  • Ocean current: Panama (warm) current ends
  • Precipitation: under one inch; dry season begins
  • Sun intensity: moderate

Wildlife

  • Nesting: Giant tortoises, green sea turtles, red-footed and masked boobies, flamingos, magnificent frigates, great frigates, Galapagos penguins, finches, flightless cormorants, land iguanas, marine iguanas, waved albatrosses
  • Mating: Sea lions, blue-footed boobies, red-footed boobies, masked boobies, flamingos, Galapagos penguins, finches, flightless cormorants

Other

  • Along with June, May has the pleasant weather
  • Land iguana eggs are hatching
  • Green sea turtle eggs are hatching

June in Galapagos

Climate

  • Average high: 79F
  • Average water temperature: 73F
  • Ocean current: Humboldt (cold) current begins
  • Precipitation: Trace, with mist or drizzle
  • Sun intensity: Moderate

Wildlife

  • Nesting: Red-footed and masked boobies, flamingos, magnificent frigates, great frigates, Galapagos penguins, finches, flightless cormorants, waved albatrosses
  • Mating: Sea lions, blue-footed boobies, red-footed boobies, masked boobies, flamingos, Galapagos penguins, finches, flightless cormorants

Other

  • Along with May, June has the most pleasant weather in the Galapagos
  • Giant tortoises begin migration
  • Humpback whales arrive
  • Magnificent frigates begin their displays

July in Galapagos

Climate

  • Average high: 79F
  • Average water temperature: 72F
  • Ocean current: Humboldt (cold) current
  • Precipitation: Trace, with mist or drizzle
  • Sun intensity: Moderate

Wildlife

  • Nesting: Red-footed and masked boobies, flamingos, magnificent frigates, great frigates, Galapagos penguins, finches, flightless cormorants, waved albatrosses
  • Mating: Sea lions, blue-footed boobies, red-footed boobies, masked boobies, flamingos, Galapagos penguins, finches, flightless cormorants

Other

  • Humboldt current brings nutrients; underwater life flourishes
  • Dolphin and whale spotting more common
  • Winds are more pronounced
  • Flightless cormorant courtship rituals begin

August in Galapagos

Climate

  • Average high: 79F
  • Average water temperature: 71F
  • Ocean current: Humboldt (cold) current
  • Precipitation: Trace, with mist or drizzle
  • Sun intensity: Moderate

Wildlife

  • Nesting: Giant tortoises, blue-footed boobies, red-footed boobies, masked boobies, flamingos, magnificent frigates, great frigates, Galapagos penguins, finches, flightless cormorants, waved albatrosses
  • Mating: Sea lions, fur seals, red-footed boobies, masked boobies, flamingos, Galapagos penguins, finches, flightless cormorants

Other

  • Humboldt current brings nutrients; underwater life flourishes
  • Dolphin and whale spotting more common
  • Winds are more pronounced; stronger wave action
  • Sea lion pupping season begins

September in Galapagos

Climate

  • Average high: 79F
  • Average water temperature: 72F
  • Ocean current: Humboldt (cold) current
  • Precipitation: Trace, with mist or drizzle
  • Sun intensity: Moderate

Wildlife

  • Nesting: Giant tortoises, blue-footed boobies, red-footed boobies, masked boobies, flamingos, magnificent frigates, great frigates, Galapagos penguins, finches, flightless cormorants, waved albatrosses
  • Mating: Sea lions, fur seals, red-footed boobies, masked boobies, flamingos, Galapagos penguins, finches, flightless cormorants

Other

  • Humboldt current brings nutrients; underwater life flourishes
  • Dolphin and whale spotting more common
  • Winds are more pronounced; stronger wave action
  • Brown pelicans arrive
  • Giant tortoises are laying eggs

October in Galapagos

Climate

  • Average high: 79F
  • Average water temperature: 73F
  • Ocean current: Humboldt (cold) current
  • Precipitation: Trace, with mist or drizzle
  • Sun intensity: Moderate

Wildlife

  • Nesting: Giant tortoises, blue-footed boobies, red-footed boobies, masked boobies, flamingos, magnificent frigates, great frigates, Galapagos penguins, finches, flightless cormorants, waved albatrosses, lava herons
  • Mating: Sea lions, fur seals, red-footed boobies, masked boobies, flamingos, Galapagos penguins, finches, flightless cormorants

Other

  • Humboldt current brings nutrients; underwater life flourishes
  • Dolphin and whale spotting more common
  • Winds are more pronounced; stronger wave action
  • Giant tortoises are laying eggs

November in Galapagos

Climate

  • Average high: 79F
  • Average water temperature: 73F
  • Ocean current: Panama (warm) current
  • Precipitation: Trace, with mist or drizzle
  • Sun intensity: High

Wildlife

  • Nesting: Blue-footed boobies, red-footed boobies, masked boobies, flamingos, magnificent frigates, great frigates, Galapagos penguins, finches, flightless cormorants, waved albatrosses, lava herons
  • Mating: Green sea turtles, sea lions, fur seals, red-footed boobies, masked boobies, flamingos, Galapagos penguins, finches, flightless cormorants

Other

  • Humboldt current ends
  • Dolphin and whale spotting more common
  • Winds begin to calm; seas are calmer
  • Sea lion pups play in the waters

December in Galapagos

Climate

  • Average high: 81F
  • Average water temperature: 73F
  • Ocean current: Humboldt (cold) current
  • Precipitation: Trace, with mist or drizzle
  • Sun intensity: Moderate

Wildlife

  • Nesting: Blue-footed boobies, red-footed boobies, masked boobies, flamingos, magnificent frigates, great frigates, Galapagos penguins, finches, flightless cormorants, waved albatrosses, lava herons
  • Mating: Giant tortoises, green sea turtles, marine iguanas, land iguanas, sea lions, red-footed boobies, masked boobies, flamingos, Galapagos penguins, finches, flightless cormorants

Other

  • Panama current arrives
  • Start of warm season; plants begin to bud
  • Giant tortoise eggs are hatching
  • Green sea turtles are mating

Dreaming of the Galapagos Islands? LANDED provides personalized, custom travel within Central America, South America, and the Antarctic. We’ll create a unique itinerary plan tailored to your interests and dreams. Experience the trip of a lifetime. Speak with one of our expert travel planners today at 801.582.2100.