Southern Amazon

Tambopata Research Center

Tambopata Research Center

Tambopata Research Center (known colloquially as “TRC”) is the only lodge that lies within Tambopata National Reserve–one of the crown jewels of Peru’s Amazon Basin. TRC one of the most remote lodges in South America. It is axiomatic that remoteness has advantages when you’re seeking rare wildlife; reportedly, one of every three guests at TRC has seen a jaguar. Good luck doing that from a “more convenient” lodge or a river cruise.

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Refugio Amazonas

Refugio Amazonas

Nestled within a private reserve in Peru’s Amazon Basin, Refugio Amazonas is an eco-lodge offering family-friendly, soft-adventure, and science-focused multi-day programs. This is one of our favorite rainforest lodges–a great option for intrepid travelers. Refugio Amazonas is located on a 494-acre private reserve in the fabled Tambopata jungle. Refugio Amazonas is home to Wired Amazon, a Citizen Science program that engages guests in gathering scientific information. You might even discover new species during your stay.

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Posada Amazonas

Posada Amazonas

Within the pristine Amazon Rainforest, Posada Amazonas lodge seeks to connec their guests to the natural and cultural wonders of the Tambopata jungle.
The Lodge is owned by the Ese Eja indigenous community of nearby Infierno, and managed in partnership with Rainforest Expeditions.

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Inkaterra Hacienda Concepcion

Inkaterra Hacienda Concepcion

Inkaterra Hacienda Concepcion is located along the Madre de Dios River, near the Tambopata National Reserve in the heart of the Peruvian Amazon. This family-friendly lodge property was once a cacao and rubber plantation. The surrounding area is a habitat for macaws, giant river otters, monkeys, and caimans.

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Delfin Amazon Cruises

Delfin Amazon Cruises

The Amazon Basin covers roughly 60% of Peru. One of the most biodiverse habitats on Earth, this densely forested region is home to just over 44% of Peru’s avian species and 65% of its mammals. Peru’s tributaries merge with rivers from across the northern half of the continent, flowing more than 3,000 miles from the Andes to the Atlantic.

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